Welcome Spring and Still Survive Your Allergies

SUNDAY, March 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you have seasonal allergies, the arrival of spring on Monday is probably less about warmth and flowers and more about itchy eyes and congestion.

Early Allergies -- Payback for a Mild Winter?

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The mild winter in many parts of the United States looks like it could mean an early and severe allergy season, a physician says.

Health Tip: Create an Emergency Plan for Deadly Allergy Reaction

(HealthDay News) -- An anaphylaxis emergency plan is key to protecting your child against a deadly allergic reaction -- especially at school when you're not around.

Banishing Asthma-Inducing Mice Allergens on the Cheap

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Professional pest management may not be needed to control asthma in kids with a mouse allergy, researchers say.

Obesity May Raise Girls' Risk of Asthma, Allergies

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Obese girls may face a significantly higher risk for developing allergies, a new study suggests.

Secondhand Smoke Linked to Food Allergies in Kids

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke in the first few weeks of life could boost the risk that kids will develop food allergies, a new study suggests.

Daffodils, Margaritas and Other Surprise Skin Dangers

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You probably know to steer clear of poison ivy. But did you know that sipping a Margarita or eating an orange in the sunshine can cause a similar skin rash?

FDA Approves New Treatment for Dust Mite Allergies

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new treatment for dust mite allergies has won approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Health Tip: Dust Your Home Properly

(HealthDay News) -- Dust can be more than a nuisance. People who are allergic to dust can have trouble breathing if too much of it gathers in one place.

Needed: An 'Action Plan' for Kids Prone to Severe Allergic Reactions

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When kids are at risk of severe allergic reactions, all their caregivers should have a written action plan and epinephrine auto-injectors readily available, according to new reports from the American Academy of Pediatrics.