Kids From Poorer Families May Have Worse Food Allergy Care

WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A family's income may play a big role in the type of care a child with food allergies receives, a new study suggests.

Cow's Milk Allergy in Childhood May Lead to Weaker Bones: Study

WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are allergic to cow's milk may have weaker bones than kids with other food allergies, a small study suggests.

Can Certain Allergy Meds Worsen Restless Legs Syndrome?

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Over-the-counter allergy medications may worsen symptoms of restless legs syndrome, a neurologist contends.

Health Tip: Easing Eye Allergies

(HealthDay News) -- When your eyes turn red, water and itch, it can make you miserable.

Spring Allergies? Don't Assume It's Only Pollen

FRIDAY, April 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Spring allergy season is here, so if you know your triggers you can start reducing your symptoms, experts say.

Allergy Med Might Also Fight MS-Linked Eye Damage

TUESDAY, April 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An over-the-counter antihistamine used to fight allergies may have an important new role: reversing the vision loss sometimes caused by multiple sclerosis.

Health Tip: Managing Food Allergy

(HealthDay News) -- A family member with a food allergy deserves serious attention to help protect against an allergic reaction. But does that mean you should ban the problem food?

Health Tip: Managing a Food Allergy at Work

(HealthDay News) -- Office lunches are a good opportunity to socialize with co-workers. But you should take precautions if you have a food allergy.

Inhalation Anthrax Treatment Approved

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Anthim (obiltoxaximab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat inhalational anthrax, a rare disease stemming from infected animal products. Bacillus anthracis spores also pose a deadly bioterrorism threat if released intentionally.

FDA Proposes Ban on Powdered Medical Gloves

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to ban most powdered medical gloves, saying they pose serious health risks to patients and health care providers alike.