Athletic Trainers' Group Advises Heart Tests for Young Athletes

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Young athletes should undergo heart screening before they play competitive sports, according to new guidelines released by the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA).

Dads Face Guilt About Workouts, Just Like Moms Do

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers face many of the same family and work barriers to exercise as mothers, new research indicates.

Upbeat Walking Style Might Lift Your Mood

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The way you walk can affect your mood, according to a new study.

More Evidence That Exercise May Help Fight Depression

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physically active people are less likely to show signs of depression, a new study finds.

Healthy Lifestyle May Boost Breast Cancer Survival

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise, healthy eating and good weight control may help improve survival of breast cancer patients, according to a large-scale review.

Repetitive Pitching May Cause Teens Serious Shoulder Problems

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Young athletes who pitch more than 100 balls a week risk getting a painful overuse injury that can hamper normal shoulder development, new research shows.

Exercise May Not Ward Off Teen Depression

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although exercise has long been thought to help improve the symptoms of depression, teenagers may not reap these benefits, a new British study suggests.

Coaches Don't Always Protect Young Pitchers' Arms: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Counting pitches reduces young pitchers' risk of arm damage, but many coaches don't use this method consistently, according to a new study.

Healthy Habits Might Reduce Your Colon Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A few healthy habits could reduce your risk for colon cancer, according to a new study.

Contact Sports Boost Spread of 'Superbug' Germs, Study Says

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- College athletes in contact sports such as football and soccer are more than twice as likely as other college athletes to carry a superbug known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA), new research finds.