Injury Risk May Rise When Kids Play Just One Sport

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Focusing too much on playing one favorite sport probably isn't a good idea for kids under 12, researchers report.

Health Tip: Transitioning From Bottle to Training Cup

(HealthDay News) -- Between your child's first and second birthday, it's time to transition from a baby bottle to a cup. This teaches your child the important skill of sipping, versus sucking.

Health Tip: Prepare Homemade Baby Food

(HealthDay News) -- Some new parents enjoy making homemade baby food. But it's important to follow safety guidelines to help prevent food poisoning.

Savvy Marketing Gets Schoolkids to Eat Their Greens

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- How can public schools entice teens to use salad bars in the cafeteria? Promote them, researchers say.

Health Tip: Promote Peace in a Shared Bedroom

(HealthDay News) -- Kids who share a bedroom may bicker and fight, but parents can help promote a more peaceful co-existence.

Obese Moms May Fail to Spot Obesity in Their Own Kids

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many overweight and obese mothers may underestimate the weight of their obese children, a new study finds.

Skip the Antibiotics for Mild Eczema in Kids

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Despite widespread use, antibiotics are not an effective treatment for milder cases of the skin condition eczema in children, a new study contends.

Kids Start Moving Less After Age 7, Study Finds

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents have seen their rambunctious 5-year-old age into a teen "couch potato." But a new study finds the slowdown in activity may begin long before adolescence.

Too Much Screen Time May Raise Kids' Diabetes Risk

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who get too much screen time may be more likely to have risk factors that increase their chances of type 2 diabetes, new research says.

Refugees Deserve Health Care, Compassion, U.S. Pediatricians Say

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. government should treat immigrant and refugee children with compassion and provide them with appropriate health care, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says in a new policy statement.