Implantable Defibrillator May Not Mean End to Sports

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Competitive sports may be safe for many athletes who have an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), new research suggests.

Moving Toward a Better Blood Pressure Pill

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Combining low doses of several different blood pressure drugs may be better than using a standard dose of just one medication, a new review of past studies suggests.

Cirrhosis Could Raise Stroke Risk

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cirrhosis -- a stiffening of liver tissue that's often tied to excessive drinking of alcohol -- may also raise an older person's odds for a stroke, a new study suggests.

Health Tip: How to Spot a Sprained Neck

(HealthDay News) -- A car crash or upper-body injury can cause significant pain that could point to a sprained muscle or ligament in the neck.

MS-Related Brain Changes May Affect Social Skills

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Subtle brain changes may explain why some people with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose their ability to interpret clues about what other people are thinking and feeling, a new study suggests.

Communication Problems Not at Root of Tantrums in Kids With Autism

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorders probably aren't throwing more tantrums because of a lack of ability to communicate, new research suggests.

Can a 70-Year-Old Have the Arteries of a 20-Year-Old?

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine having the clear, supple, healthy blood vessels of a 20-year-old in your 70s. It's possible, but "challenging," a new study suggests.

Can People 'Sniff' Out Illness in Others?

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People's ability to use smell and vision to detect and avoid others who are sick is better than believed, a new study suggests.

Meth Addicts' Hearts May Improve If They Quit

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Methamphetamine users who quit the drug may get a break: New research suggests it's possible to reverse heart damage with proper medical treatment.

Bystander CPR Helps Save Brain Function After Near-Drowning

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Near-drowning victims are more likely to recover with good brain function if bystanders immediately begin chest compressions rather than wait for emergency personnel to arrive, researchers report.