Women With Grandkids May Leave Workforce Sooner

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with grandchildren are more likely to retire early, according to a new study.

Stronger Muscles = Healthier Bones in Kids

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stronger muscles seems to mean healthier bones in children, according to a new study.

Brain Scans Give Clues to Link Between Alzheimer's, Down Syndrome

FRIDAY, April 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- It's long been known that people with Down syndrome are at higher risk for Alzheimer's disease.

Americans Get Too Many Tests Before Cataract Surgery, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older Americans get a lot of unnecessary tests before they undergo cataract surgery, a new study suggests.

Heavy Snoring, Apnea Tied to Earlier Brain Troubles

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy snorers and people with sleep apnea may be more likely to develop memory and thinking problems at younger ages than their well-rested peers, a new study suggests.

Depression Plus Diabetes May Boost Dementia Risk

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and diabetes are each hard on the brain, and having both conditions may significantly raise the risk of dementia, according to new research.

Mouse Study Suggests Immune Disorder May Play Role in Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An immune system disorder may play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, research in mice suggests.

To Protect Your Aging Brain, Start With Exercise

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There are things people can do to preserve their brain function as they age, a report released Tuesday from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) suggests.

Bone-Building Drug Strengthened Hips, Spines of Frail Women in Study

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Frail, older women may only need a single dose of the osteoporosis drug Reclast to build bone strength, a new study suggests.

Could Obesity Help Protect Against Dementia?

THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study of nearly 2 million people suggests that those who are overweight or obese in middle age may be less likely to develop dementia than their normal and underweight peers.