Mothers of Kids With Severe Birth Defects May Have Shorter Lives: Study

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mother raising a child with a major birth defect may face a higher risk of dying early compared with a mother whose child doesn't have a birth defect, Danish research suggests.

Drug Overdose Deaths Climb Dramatically in U.S.

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Drug overdose deaths continue to surge in the United States, with most fatalities linked to the illicit use of prescription painkillers, new government statistics reveal.

Anti-Aging Process Rejuvenates Lab Mice: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In what sounds like a sci-fi movie come true, researchers say they used gene manipulation to counter aging in mice.

The Happy Get Lucky in Their Older Years

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- "Don't worry, be happy" is not only a motto for enjoying life, it might actually help older folks live longer, researchers report.

Where You Live May Determine How You Die

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People along the southern stretch of the Mississippi River are more likely to die from heart problems than anywhere else in the United States.

Emergency Surgery Riskier for Kids in Poorer Countries

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds.

Test Predicting Alzheimer's Would Be Welcome, Survey Finds

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If a test could tell them they were going to develop Alzheimer's disease, most American seniors would take it, a new study finds.

Beta Blockers May Not Be Best Heart Drugs for Dementia Patients

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack.

Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Could cholesterol-fighting statins fend off Alzheimer's disease?

Was Football Safer Back in the Day?

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and 1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems.