Health Tip: Symptoms That May Signal Dandruff

(HealthDay News) -- Dandruff, medically called seborrheic dermatitis, typically causes flaky skin on the scalp. In infants, it's sometimes called cradle cap.

Health Tip: Unwind With Yoga

(HealthDay News) -- Yoga may be a great way to exercise, relax and even relieve pain.

Violent Video Games May Not Desensitize Kids: Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A long-standing concern among parents and researchers has been that young people who are exposed to violent video games may become desensitized to violent acts and images, but a new study suggests that may not be the case.

Autopsies Reveal Alzheimer's Often Misdiagnosed

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that diagnosing Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia is not always clear-cut, raising the possibility of misdiagnoses among many seniors.

Timely Care May Be Key to Treating Infected Cuts

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- When treating children infected with an antibiotic-resistant strain of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), thoroughly and quickly cleaning the wound is more critical than the kind of antibiotic used, new research suggests.

Early Childhood Might Affect Love Life in Adult

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- How quickly and smoothly people move on from a lover's quarrel has a lot to do with the relationships each partner had in earliest childhood with the people who raised them, new research reveals.

Study Unravels Link Between Stress and Chronic Health Issues

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- People's emotional response to challenges may affect how their body reacts to stress, according to a new study.

Cigarette Smoke Fuels Mucus Production in People With Bronchitis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases the production of mucus associated with chronic bronchitis, a new study shows.

More Evidence Ties Moderate Drinking to Heart Health

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate alcohol consumption may help protect against heart disease, according to two new papers by Canadian researchers.

Stress Hormone Linked to PTSD Symptoms in Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women, but not men, with post-traumatic stress disorder have high blood levels of a stress-related hormone, new research shows.

Laser Technology Might Help Doctors Diagnose Melanoma

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've developed a new and potentially more accurate way to diagnose melanoma lesions, using laser technology.

Pot Ingredient May Restore Appetite After Chemo

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The main active ingredient in marijuana seems to allow chemotherapy patients to regain their ability to taste and enjoy food, according to the results of a small new study.

Health Highlights: Feb. 23, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Microchip Spots Cancerous Tumors Within an Hour, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they have developed a microchip that can be attached to a smart phone and diagnose cancerous tumors within an hour, from the patient's bedside.

Clinical Trials Update: Feb. 23, 2011

(HealthDay News) -- Here are the latest clinical trials, courtesy of ClinicalConnection.com:

Coffee, Sex, Smog Can All Trigger Heart Attack, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A major analysis of data on potential triggers for heart attacks finds that many of the substances and activities Americans indulge in every day -- coffee, alcohol, sex, even breathing -- can all help spur an attack.

Kids Growing Up on Farms Less Likely to Have Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In a European study that echoes the findings of other scientists, researchers have found that children who grow up on farms are less likely to develop childhood asthma.

Fast Response Crucial in Outbreaks of Food-Borne Illness: Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly three years after a nationwide salmonella outbreak that sickened about 1,500 people and claimed two lives, U.S. epidemiologists have learned that speed is of the essence in identifying sources of food contamination and preventing further infection.