Health Tip: Does Acne Need a Doctor's Care?

(HealthDay News) -- If your acne is well controlled by gently washing with soap and water, and by using over-the-counter lotions or creams, you may not have to visit your doctor.

Health Tip: Managing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

(HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) can make even the simplest daily activities -- such as taking a shower or getting dressed -- completely exhausting, the Womenshealth.gov Web site says.

Statins Might Help HIV Patients, Study Suggests

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research suggests that statins restrain the immune systems of HIV patients and may stave off progression of the AIDS-causing virus.

Many Dialysis Patients at Risk for High Radiation Exposure

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A large number of dialysis patients are at increased risk of cancer due to high radiation doses, and doctors should think about reducing these patients' levels of radiation exposure, a new study suggests.

Type 1 Diabetes Patients Need New Kidney Therapies: Study

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Despite major advances in kidney care over the last two decades, type 1 diabetes patients with kidney dysfunction still have high rates of kidney failure and heart-related death, researchers have found.

Newer Drug May Help Prevent Fracture in Men With Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug called denosumab (Xgeva) performed somewhat better than the current standard treatment of zoledronic acid (Zometa) for preventing fractures and other bone problems in men with hormone-resistant prostate cancer, a new study suggests.

Most 'Locked-In Syndrome' Patients Happy, Survey Finds

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most "locked-in syndrome" patients -- a condition caused by brain stem injury -- claim to be happy, according to a new study.

PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer Dips in Large U.S. Health Network

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer men at a large U.S. health-care network are undergoing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer since the release of guidelines in 2008 and the publication of two large studies a few years ago, say researchers.

People More Likely to Act Morally Than They Imagine

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- People are more likely to act morally than they would predict, a new study finds.

Coffee, Sex, Smog Can All Trigger Heart Attack, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A major analysis of data on potential triggers for heart attacks finds that many of the substances and activities Americans indulge in every day -- coffee, alcohol, sex, even breathing -- can all help spur an attack.

PCBs Might Be Linked to Failed IVF Attempts

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were banned decades ago, they are still pervasive in the United States and may contribute to failed in vitro fertilization (IVF) attempts, a new study suggests.

Severe Heart Attack No More Deadly to Women Than Men

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Gender does not appear to have any impact on the risk of dying following a severe heart attack, new research indicates.

Rapid Rise in PSA Levels a Poor Predictor of Prostate Cancer: Study

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Blood tests that indicate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are rising rapidly over time are of little use in detecting aggressive prostate cancer and should not be done, a new study indicates.

Health Highlights: Feb. 24, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Spinal Fluid May Hold Clues to Lyme Disease, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of proteins in spinal fluid can help distinguish patients with Lyme disease from those with chronic fatigue syndrome, a new study reports.

Clinical Trials Update: Feb. 24, 2011

(HealthDay News) -- Here are the latest clinical trials, courtesy of ClinicalConnection.com:

Scientists Say Newborn Mice Can Regrow Damaged Hearts

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse heart rapidly regenerated itself after researchers removed a portion of the organ a day after birth, scientists report.

Plague Kills U.S. Lab Worker

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- While experts stress that epidemics of plague will probably remain a scourge of centuries past, isolated cases still appear, even in the United States.

Herceptin May Boost Long-Term Survival After Aggressive Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The cancer drug Herceptin produces significantly longer disease-free survival in women with an aggressive type of early-stage breast cancer who take the drug for a year after standard chemotherapy, a new study suggests.

Medical Groups Warn Of Climate Change's Potential Impact on Health

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Experts from leading U.S. medical groups gathered Thursday to warn of impending dangers to human health if greenhouse gas emissions continue unchecked, speeding climate change.