Health Tip: Avoiding Parental Burnout

(HealthDay News) -- Between work and family responsibilities, parents may feel burned out, stressed and overwhelmed. These feelings may then spill into activities with the children.

Health Tip: Give Kids Nutritious Meals

(HealthDay News) -- Children's growing bodies need plenty of nutrients, but it can be difficult to get picky eaters to dine on healthy food.

The 'Bear' Facts on Obesity and Diabetes

TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The ways grizzly bears deal with hibernation and fluctuating weight might offer valuable new clues to human obesity and diabetes, new research suggests.

Women Over 75 May Benefit From Mammograms

TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women 75 and older may still benefit from routine mammograms, according to new research.

Portable Monitors OK for Spotting Sleep Apnea: New Guidelines

TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For most people, portable sleep monitors are an adequate substitute for an overnight stay in a sleep laboratory for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea, according to new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians.

People With HIV May Be at Lower Risk for Multiple Sclerosis

MONDAY, Aug. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with HIV seem to have a much lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) than those who don't have the virus, a new study finds.

Skip the Steroids for Shoulder Pain?

TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For relief of shoulder pain, physical therapy and steroid shots provide similar results, a new study finds.

Clues to How Heavy Drinking in Pregnancy Harms Child's Brain

TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When a woman drinks heavily during pregnancy, the harmful effects on her child's brain development appear to continue over time, a new study indicates.

Health Highlights: Aug. 5, 2014

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

No Link Between Sleep Apnea, Cancer, Study Finds

TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Canadian researchers have found no apparent connection between sleep apnea and cancer in a new study of more than 10,000 people with this common sleep disorder.