Antidepressants Not Just for Depression Any More

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors prescribe antidepressants for a wide range of medical problems other than depression, apparently fueling the boom in sales of these medications, researchers report.

What Really Works to Help Baby Sleep

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Common techniques for helping babies -- and parents -- sleep at night seem to carry no long-term harms, a small trial finds.

Health Tip: Massage May Help You Sleep Better

(HealthDay News) -- A relaxing, gentle massage before bed may be exactly what's needed to help you get a good night's sleep.

Severe, Untreated Sleep Apnea Linked to Aggressive Melanoma

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep is key to immune function and health, and a new study finds that may be especially true for patients battling melanoma.

Young Children With Sleep Apnea May Face Learning Difficulties: Study

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea in young children may affect youngsters' attention, memory and language development, a new study suggests.

Sleep Apnea May Raise Risks for Angioplasty Patients

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they now have more evidence that sleep apnea might worsen heart disease.

Swaddling May Increase Chances of SIDS

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If infants are swaddled during sleep, their risk of dying from SIDS is higher, especially if they are placed on their stomachs, new research suggests.

Health Tip: Sleep Well During Travel

(HealthDay News) -- Traveling for work or pleasure shouldn't involve sleepless nights.

Could Nasal Spray Curtail Nighttime Bathroom Trips?

SUNDAY, May 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Countless people -- often men with enlarged prostates -- need to visit the bathroom during the night. But help could soon be at hand in the form of a nasal spray, new research suggests.

Sleep Apnea May Raise Heart Risks in People With Pacemakers

THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with heart pacemakers and sleep apnea are at much greater risk for a dangerous heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, a new study suggests.