Weight, Growth Early in Life May Affect Adult Brain

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Birth weight and growth during childhood could affect hearing, vision, thinking and memory later in life, a new study suggests.

Bike Helmets Protect Against Severe Brain Injury, Study Says

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wearing a bicycle helmet significantly reduces the risk of serious brain injury and death from a crash, a new study shows.

Whistle … and Walk … While You Work

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If you have to sit almost all day while you work, take a short walk whenever you can.

Sun Exposure in Teen Years May Delay Onset of MS: Study

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with multiple sclerosis tend to develop it later if they had regular sun exposure as teenagers, a new study suggests -- adding to evidence linking the disease to a lack of sunlight and vitamin D.

Excess Weight Helps Women With Heart Failure, Hurts Men: Study

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and mildly obese women with heart failure may live significantly longer than similarly heavy men with the progressive disease, a new study suggests.

Suicide Risk May Rise for Some After Weight-Loss Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Troubled people who have weight-loss surgery are more likely to attempt suicide following the procedure, a new study suggests.

Health Tip: Talking to Your Doctor About Weight

(HealthDay News) -- If you're ready to lose weight, a conversation with your doctor is a great place to start. But before you meet, make sure you're fully prepared.

Move More to Prevent Heart Failure

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to preventing heart failure, the more exercise, the better.

Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Seems Good for Teen Hearts: Study

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Could just a few minutes of intense exercise three times a week reduce teens' risk of potential heart problems?

Zip Line Injuries on the Rise

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Zip lining has become a popular way to experience a little adventure, but serious injuries can be an unintended consequence of that momentary thrill, researchers report.