'Pretend Mommy' Program Doesn't Deter Teen Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Teens are more, not less, likely to become pregnant if they take part in prevention programs that use lifelike robot babies to demonstrate the realities of motherhood, a new trial shows.

Autism-Linked Genes Often Differ Between Siblings

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In families that have more than one child with autism, the gene variations underlying each child's disorder often differ, new research shows.

Music Therapy Helps Preemie Babies Thrive

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The soothing sound of mom singing may help premature newborns breathe easier, a new review finds.

Health Tip: Help Kids Get Enough Exercise

(HealthDay News) -- You know kids need to move and play, but are you sure yours are getting enough exercise?

Zika May Persist for Months in Newborns, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's more bad news when it comes to Zika's effect on infants: A case study suggests the virus can live and cause damage in newborns for at least two months after birth.

Could Weight-Loss Surgery Boost Odds of Preemie Birth?

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers-to-be who've had weight-loss surgery may have increased odds for premature delivery, researchers report.

Season of Conception May Affect Fetal Brain Growth

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children conceived during the winter are more likely to have learning disabilities, and a mother's exposure to sunlight may play a role, a new study suggests.

Health Tip: Losing Hair After Pregnancy

(HealthDay News) -- Hormonal changes cause some new moms to lose hair after pregnancy. But there are things women can do to help their hair look fuller.

Gene Test Might Quickly ID Baby's Infection

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A quick genetic test might one day help doctors determine within hours whether a baby's fever is from a virus or a serious bacterial infection.

ADHD More Often Missed in Minority Kids

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While a higher percentage of black children show the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than white kids, they are less likely to be diagnosed or treated for the disorder, researchers report.