Babies Prefer Sound of Other Babies Over Adults

FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Babies would rather listen to other babies than adults, and this preference may help in their language development, a new study suggests.

Health Tip: Don't Use Food as a Reward

(HealthDay News) -- Food shouldn't be used as a reward to encourage good behavior in children, experts say. Children should learn that food is to fuel the body, not an indulgence.

For Kids Who Stutter, Rhythm Perception May Be Key

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children who stutter may have difficulty perceiving musical rhythms, a small study suggests.

Heed the Warning Signs of Teen Suicide, Experts Say

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Youth suicide is a major problem in the United States, but being alert to the warning signs can help avert tragedy, experts say.

First Part of Ejaculate May Be Primed for Conception

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The initial portion of ejaculate is most likely to lead to conception, a small new study suggests.

Delaying Umbilical Cord Clamping Might Boost Child Development

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Waiting about three minutes to clamp the umbilical cord following a baby's delivery may help improve children's fine-motor and social skills at age 4 years, new Swedish research suggests.

Fewer U.S. Hospitals Send New Moms Home With Formula

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While the percentage of hospitals that send breast-feeding mothers home with formula packs has fallen dramatically during the last several years, about one-third of U.S. hospitals still do so, newly released data shows.

Health Tip: Be Safe Around Lawn Mowers

(HealthDay News) -- Thousands of adults and children are hurt each year from lawn mower-related accidents.

Tips for Preventing Dog Bites

MONDAY, May 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Dog bites are a serious public health issue, but many are preventable, experts say.

Dyslexia Unrelated to Vision Problems: Study

MONDAY, May 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eye training or other vision therapies will not treat dyslexia in children, say researchers who found normal vision among most children with the learning disability.