Health Tip: Getting Used to Your Hearing Aid

(HealthDay News) -- Getting used to a new hearing aid can be challenging, but there are things you can do to help make the transition easier.

Health Tip: Prevent Illness From Infected Pets

(HealthDay News) -- Pets typically are prized members of the family. But as with their human counterparts, they can also spread disease, the Nemours Foundation says.

Many Higher-Income Parents Forgoing Kids' Vaccinations: Report

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates for children insured by commercial plans dropped almost four percentage points between 2008 and 2009, even though the rate of children on Medicaid getting vaccinated is rising.

Many Coaches Unprepared for Student-Athletes' Asthma

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Only one in three children's athletic coaches reports being adequately trained to deal with asthma symptoms in kids, a new study found.

Brain Can Compensate for Cognitive Damage

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Undamaged areas of the brain can compensate for damage in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex, which is important for memory and attention, a new study finds.

Concussion Rate in Young Hockey Players Higher Than Thought

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of concussions among teen and young adult hockey players is more than three times higher than previously believed, and the issue needs to be taken more seriously by players, parents, coaches and doctors, researchers warn.

Good Conversation Can Boost Brain Power, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Friendly discussions with other people can help you solve common life challenges, but conversations that are competitive in tone aren't helpful, finds a new study.

Anorexia Linked With Unplanned Pregnancies

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women with anorexia nervosa are much more likely to have unplanned pregnancies and abortions than women without the eating disorder, a study of Norwegian women has found.

Patients Who Swallow Foreign Objects a Costly Burden to Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatric disorders are common among people who intentionally swallow foreign objects, a behavior that is costly for the health-care system, a new study shows.

Could Anger Make People Want Things More?

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Anger can be a potent motivator in increasing a person's desire to obtain things, a new study finds.

Asthma Linked to Lung Cancer Risk in Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- University of Missouri researchers believe they have found a correlation between asthma and lung cancer in a small study.

Pricey Drugs May Not Mean Better Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of drug spending don't necessarily translate into better quality care for Medicare patients, a new study has found.

Possible Genetic 'Switches' for Blood Sugar Control Detected

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A new genetic analysis has uncovered specific regions in the DNA of certain human pancreatic cells that appear central to the regulation of insulin and other functions of the pancreas.

FDA Failing to Monitor Safety of Medical Devices: Report

TUESDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is not doing its job of properly monitoring the safety of medical devices, the authors of a new report charge.

Health Highlights: Nov. 3, 2010

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Clinical Trials Update: Nov. 3, 2010

(HealthDay News) -- Here are the latest clinical trials, courtesy of ClinicalConnection.com:

Use of Prostate Cancer Treatment Fell When Medicare Paid Docs Less

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- When Medicare cut its reimbursement rates for hormonal treatment for men with prostate cancer, use declined drastically.

Gene Associated With Autism May Alter How Brain Functions

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- People with a common genetic variant that's associated with autism have a "disconnect" between their frontal lobe and other areas of the brain important for language, brain scans show.

Hemophilia Drug Used Off-Label Raises Clot Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A drug approved to help staunch bleeding in people with hemophilia raises the risk of heart attacks and stroke when it's used to stop life-threatening bleeding due to other conditions, such as trauma or surgery, a new study finds.