Health Tip: Feel Like You Have No Energy?

(HealthDay News) -- Fatigue describes the feeling that you have no energy or motivation.

Health Tip: Help Prevent Ingrown Toenails

(HealthDay News) -- Trim your toenails too short, and you could be setting yourself up for a painful problem.

New Therapy for Enlarged Prostate May Bypass Unpleasant Side Effects

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A minimally invasive treatment for enlarged prostate that limits blood supply to the prostate seems to be just as effective as surgery but without the risk of debilitating side effects, such as impotence and urinary incontinence.

Some Teens Born With Cleft Palate Adjust Better Than Others

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Some young people born with a cleft lip or cleft palate adjust better than others, a new survey finds.

Parkinson's Drugs Linked to Behavior Problems in Study

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease drugs called dopamine agonists appear to cause impulse control problems in almost one-quarter of patients, says a new study.

MRSA Infections May Vary by Season

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Dangerous methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, infections occur more often in the summer and fall, and this seasonal increase is more common in children than adults, a new study reports.

Younger, Poorer People More Prone to Problem Gambling

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Problem gambling is more common among American adults than alcohol dependence, a new study suggests.

Better Cleaning in ICUs Lowers MRSA Infection Rates

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Enhanced cleaning of hospital intensive care units reduces the risk of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection for patients placed in a room previously occupied by someone with MRSA, a new study finds.

Nerve Block Treatment May Ease Stubborn High Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A technique that interrupts nerve signals between the kidneys and brain dropped blood pressure to normal levels in 39 percent of patients with drug-resistant hypertension, according to a small new study led by French researchers.

Risks May Rise With Need for Nursing Care After Heart Failure

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with heart failure who require skilled nursing care after discharge from the hospital face an increased risk for poor outcomes, including death, a new study has found.

Death Rates of Children, Young Adults Show Reversal

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Death rates among teens and young adults aged 15 to 24 are now higher than among children aged 1 to 4 years in many countries, says a new study that shows a reversal of historical death patterns.

Less Stress, Better Sleep May Help You Lose Weight

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- If you're looking to lose those extra pounds, you should probably add reducing stress and getting the right amount of sleep to the list, say researchers from Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research in Portland.

Health Highlights: March 30, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Clinical Trials Update: March 29, 2011

(HealthDay News) -- Here are the latest clinical trials, courtesy of ClinicalConnection.com:

Just-Approved Defibrillators Limit Unnecessary Shocks

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Defibrillator maker Medtronic says its new line of Protecta devices has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The devices incorporate "Smart Shock" technology that recognizes when irregular heartbeats are life-threatening and delivers therapeutic shocks "only when appropriate," Medtronic said in a news release.

Benefits of Radiation Therapy Outweigh Risks of a Second Cancer: Study

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- The odds a second cancer will develop after radiation treatment for a first cancer are relatively low, U.S. National Cancer Institute researchers report.

Some Type 1 Diabetics Seem Shielded Against Complications

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- While complications from type 1 diabetes are common, they aren't inevitable. New research suggests that some people with the disease apparently have an inherent protection against serious complications, such as eye, kidney and heart disease.