Health Tip: Parenting a Child With a Heart Defect

(HealthDay News) -- Children born with a heart defect can live long and healthy lives.

Health Tip: Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Damage Joints

(HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis causes chronic swelling and inflammation in the joints, which can result in permanent damage and long-term complications.

College Students Smoke When They Party, Drink and Work

TUESDAY Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- College students tend to smoke when they are partying, drinking and working, according to a new study.

More Blacks Die in Hospital After Diverticulitis Surgery

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly black patients who require surgery for an intestinal condition called diverticulitis are much more likely to die in the hospital than white patients, a new study has found.

Get Rid of Bumpers, Stuffed Animals in Baby's Crib

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A comfortable and safe sleep environment is crucial for infants and could mean the different between life and death, pediatricians say.

Meditation Can 'Turn Off' Regions of the Brain

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds that people skilled at meditation seem able to turn off areas of the brain associated with daydreaming and psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

Study Looks at Nude Images' Effect on the Brain

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- How the human brain perceives nudity is boosted at an early stage of visual processing, researchers say, and that ability may be tied to mating.

Too Much Acetaminophen Over Time May Damage Liver

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Taking slightly too much of the pain reliever acetaminophen (best known by the brand name Tylenol) over time can lead to an overdose that can cause liver failure and death, according to a new study.

BPA Levels Spike After Eating Canned Soup: Study

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A new study says that regular consumption of canned soup may be associated with an increase in levels of bisphenol A (BPA), which has been associated with a number of harmful health effects.

ER Visits for Energy-Drink Ills Soar in U.S.

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- As the popularity of non-alcoholic "energy" drinks skyrockets, so do related health problems, a new study finds.

How Much Salt Is Best for the Heart?

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For people with heart disease or diabetes, too little salt may harbor almost as much danger as too much salt, researchers report.

Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Safe for Long-Term Use, Study Finds

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- British researchers have good news for anyone taking the cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins: These drugs are effective and safe, even when used for long periods of time, they say.

Health Highlights: Nov. 22, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

HIV Patients at Heightened Risk for Certain Cancers

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A weakened immune system and unhealthy lifestyle habits such as smoking put HIV-infected patients at increased risk for cancer, according to a new study.

Chronic Bowel Disease Drugs Linked to Skin Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be at increased risk for skin cancer due to their use of immunosuppressant drugs to treat the intestinal disorder, according to the results of two new studies.

Surgery May Boost Survival With Dangerous Heart Condition

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with a condition called infective endocarditis, coupled with heart failure, heart valve surgery can reduce the risk of dying by nearly two-thirds, a new study suggests.

Study Links Coffee to Lower Risk of Endometrial Cancer

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women who drink moderate to high amounts of coffee may reduce their risk for endometrial cancer, new research reveals.

Merck to Pay $950M to Settle Probe of Vioxx Marketing

TUESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Justice Department said Tuesday that the drug company Merck will pay $950 million to resolve investigations into its marketing of the blockbuster painkiller Vioxx, which was pulled from the market in 2004 after studies revealed the drug increased users' risks of heart attack and stroke.