Beta-blockers are used for hypertension as well as for a variety of heart conditions.

Drugs that fall into this family include

  • Acebutolol hydrochloride (Sectral)
  • Atenolol (Tenormin)
  • Alprenolol
  • Betaxolol hydrochloride (Kerlone)
  • Bisoprolol fumarate (Zebeta)
  • Carteolol (Cartrol)
  • Carvedilol (Coreg)
  • Esmolol hydrochloride (Brevibloc)
  • Labetalol hydrochloride (Normodyne, Trandate)
  • Metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
  • Nadolol (Corgard)
  • Penbutolol (Levatol)
  • Pindolol (Visken)
  • Propranolol hydrochloride (Betachron E-R, Inderal, Inderal LA)
  • Sotalol (Betapace)
  • Timolol maleate (Blocadren)
  • and others

Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 )

Supplementation Possibly Helpful

There is some evidence that beta-blockers (specifically propranolol, metoprolol, and alprenolol) might impair the body's ability to utilize the substance coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10).1,2 This is particularly worrisome, because CoQ 10 appears to play a significant role in normal heart function.3 Depletion of CoQ 10 might be responsible for some of the side effects of beta-blockers. In one study, CoQ 10 supplements reduced side effects caused by the beta-blocker propranolol.4 The beta-blocker timolol may interfere with CoQ 10 production to a lesser extent than other beta-blockers.

Chromium

Possible Helpful Interaction

Beta-blockers have been known to reduce levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol. According to one study, chromium supplementation can offset this adverse effect.5

Coleus forskohlii

Theoretical Interaction

The herb Coleus forskohlii relaxes blood vessels and might have unpredictable effects on blood pressure if combined with beta-blockers.