Rules Help When Talking About Infertility

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- When couples have difficulty getting pregnant, the amount of information they share with family and friends may depend on who feels more stigmatized by the problem, a new study finds.

Routine Chores Might Help Keep Dementia at Bay

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- If you've ever wished you didn't have to fold laundry, mow the lawn or stand in line, consider this: Those daily activities may help keep dementia at bay.

Health Tip: When a Doctor Should Evaluate Diaper Rash

(HealthDay News) -- Diaper rash is usually easily treated and isn't a cause for concern. But severe cases may require a doctor's care.

Health Tip: Some Facts About Angiodema

(HealthDay News) -- Angiodema is the medical term for hive-like swelling beneath the skin. It's often caused by an allergic reaction.

Going Straight to Chemo May Be Better for Certain Breast Cancers

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients with the BRCA1 gene mutation have a much better response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy -- chemo given before other treatment -- than other breast cancer patients, a new study finds.

Seizure Disorder Diagnosed Later in Veterans Than Civilians: Study

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Veterans who suffer emotion-related seizures that are not caused by epilepsy can go undiagnosed for much longer than civilians with the condition, according to a new study.

Hospitalized Kids May Receive Up to 35 Meds a Week

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Some children, especially those with rare conditions, receive many different drugs while in the hospital, a new study finds.

Short-Term Memory Loss May Be Best Predictor of Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Mild cognitive impairment -- marked by a loss in short-term memory in particular -- may be a stronger predictor of Alzheimer's disease than so-called "biomarkers," which include things such as changes in brain volume or levels of certain proteins in cerebrospinal fluid, a new study suggests.

Patient Care Not Affected by Med Student Biases: Study

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Many first-year medical students in the United States may have an unconscious preference for white and upper social class people, but these biases don't appear to affect patient care, according to the results of a survey at one medical school.

Many Med Schools Score Poorly in Teaching Gay/Lesbian Health

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Medical schools set aside an average of only seven hours for topics related to the health care needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) patients, a new study says.

Tick-borne Illness May Lurk in Blood Supply

MONDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- An uncommon, but potentially fatal, tick-borne illness may be creeping into the U.S. blood supply and doctors need to develop a way to spot it, researchers report.

More U.S. 'Tweens' Getting Recommended Vaccines

MONDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Growing numbers of 11- and 12-year-olds are receiving their recommended vaccines, which could indicate that resistance to children's inoculations is lessening in the United States.

Healthy Living Can Cut Chances of Developing Diabetes

MONDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Living a healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of diabetes by as much as 80 percent, researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health report.

Aging, Not Menopause, Raises Women's Heart Risks, Study Finds

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There's no link between menopause and increased risk of death from heart disease, says a study that challenges a long-held medical belief that the rate of cardiovascular death in women spikes after menopause.

Burnout, Dissatisfaction Seem Rampant Among Medical Residents

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The medical resident of today -- possibly your doctor in the future -- is exhausted, emotionally spent and likely stressed out about debt, a new study indicates.

9/11 Tied to Increase in Acid Reflux Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Those who were directly exposed to the World Trade Center terrorist attacks on 9/11 appear to face an increased risk for developing long-lasting symptoms of acid reflux disease, New York City health researchers reported Tuesday.

Health Highlights: Sept. 6, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

NSAIDs May Raise Miscarriage Risk: Study

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen during the first stage of their pregnancy may be upping their risk of miscarriage, new research suggests.

Fewer U.S. Adults Smoking, CDC Says

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of smoking among U.S. adults has resumed its four-decade decline, and those who continue to light up appear to smoke less than previous generations, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.

Annual Breast Exams, Mammograms Still Key to Detecting Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to some other findings, new research indicates that mammograms and breast self-exams are useful for the detection of breast cancer, including cancers in younger women.

For Young Breast Cancer Patients, Breast-Conserving Therapy Appears Effective

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women with breast cancer who undergo a lumpectomy to remove their tumor survive just as long and aren't any more likely to have a recurrence than women who opt for the more radical and disfiguring mastectomy, or removal of the entire breast, two new studies report.