Corner Stores Stock Healthier Foods After Aid Program Changes

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Small stores in two low-income areas of North Philadelphia began stocking healthier foods after changes to a popular U.S. government food-aid program, a new study finds.

Health Tip: Manage the Pain of a Neck Sprain

(HealthDay News) -- A sprain in the ligaments of the neck can lead to symptoms including spasms, headache, stiffness and numbness in the arm or hand.

Health Tip: Am I at Risk for Gum Disease?

(HealthDay News) -- Periodontal disease, sometimes called gum disease, attacks and damages tissue called the sulcus that sits just below the gum line.

Some People More Prone to Drinking Blackouts: Study

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Some people are more likely than others to have alcohol-related blackouts due to differences in the way alcohol affects their brain, according to a new study.

Many Americans Ambivalent Over Laws Aimed at Healthy Living

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- With a recent flood of new regulations or proposals aimed at governing lifestyle choices such as smoking, eating or cellphone use, is the United States in danger of becoming a "nanny state"?

Ibuprofen May Ward Off Altitude Sickness

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-inflammatory and painkiller ibuprofen seems to reduce the risk of altitude sickness, according to a new study.

Insects Behind Chagas Disease Are Feeding on Humans in the U.S.

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Insects that are part of a family of bugs that transmit Chagas disease are well-established and feeding on human blood in certain regions of the United States, a new study finds.

Infants' Faces Trigger Caregiving Impulse in Adults' Brains

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Seeing a baby's face triggers a response in areas of adults' brains involved with emotion, reward and planning movement, a finding researchers say may indicate a natural inclination to take care of an infant.

Northeast U.S. Should Brace for Spike in Lyme Disease: Expert

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The northeastern United States may see a significant increase in cases of Lyme disease this spring, an expert warns.

Less Heart Disease Among Women in Wealthier States: Study

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- A state's level of wealth affects women's heart disease risk, a new study says.

Vitamin E Supplements Don't Affect Heart Failure Risk: Study

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin E supplements don't appear to affect a healthy woman's overall risk of heart failure one way or the other, researchers report.

Adrenaline Therapy for Cardiac Arrest Linked to Worse Outcomes

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The decades-old practice of treating cardiac arrest patients with epinephrine -- adrenaline -- might do more harm than good in the long run, suggests a new analysis of hundreds of thousands of cases.

Stem Cell Therapy Could Boost Kidney Transplant Success: Study

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- A novel technique that uses a kidney transplant recipient's own stem cells may someday replace or reduce the initial use of anti-rejection medications, new research suggests.

Health Highlights: March 20, 2012

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Blood Pressure Variance Between Arms Points to Heart Risk

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Calculating the difference in blood pressure readings taken from the left and right arms might help predict a patient's odds of dying from heart disease, a new study suggests.

Study Suggests Mental 'Fog' of Menopause Is Real

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- The memory blips and distractible moments that women say they experience during menopause may be as real as the hot flashes and poor sleep, a new study suggests.

More Evidence Shows That Daily Aspirin Might Combat Cancer

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin, a popular weapon in the war against heart attacks, may also play a role in cancer prevention and treatment, three new British studies suggest.

Physician Misconduct Showing Up on the Internet: Survey

TUESDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Some doctors are sliding down a slippery slope in their online lives, committing professional violations, whether intentional or not, and risking their careers, a new survey suggests.